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While rare in Rome, bars and cafes that have wi-fi, and are cool with people using a table to work on their laptop for a few hours, etc. do exist – provided customers buy food and drinks and don’t block the place during busy times.

The list below is by no means exhaustive. If you know of a place that we haven’t mentioned that allows this common and growing practice please contact us. Or if you’re a bar or restaurant who is interested in being listed here, please contact us.

Click the pins below for details on each place:

Anticafé Roma

Address: Via Veio, 4b
Opening hours:
Mon-Fri 9am – 9pm
Sat-Sun 10am – 9pm

Tram Depot

Address: Via Marmorata, 13
Opening hours:
8am – 2am every day of the week

Caffè dei Pittori

Address: Via Flaminia, 57
Opening hours:
Mon-Fri: 7am – 9pm
Sat: 8am – 4pm
Sun: closed

Barnum Cafè

Address: Via del Pellegrino, 87
Opening hours:
Mon-Sat: 9am – 2am
Sun: closed

Rock 'n' Coffee

Via Domenico Morichini, 37
Opening hours:
Mon-Sat: 7am–9pm
Sun: 3pm–9pm
(Formerly Buster’s Coffee Roma)

Gente di San Lorenzo

Address: Via degli Aurunci, 42
Opening hours:
Mon-Sat: 6.30am – 2am
Sun: closed

Spritz & Coffee

Address: Via dei Sabelli, 109
Opening hours:
Mon-Sat: 6am – 9pm

Baylon Cafè

Address: Via di S. Francesco a Ripa, 151
Opening hours:
6.30am – 2am every day

Arnold Coffee

Address: Via Giustiniani, 15b
Opening hours:
8am – 9pm every day

Ex • Circus

Address: Via della Vetrina, 15
Opening hours:
8am – 2am every day

Analemma Cafe

Address: Via Leonina 77
Nearest Metro: Cavour
Opening hours: Sun-Fri 8am – 1am; Sat 8am – 2am

Busters Coffee Roma

Address: Commercial Gallery, Tiburtina Station
Opening hours:
6.30am – 8.30pm every day

Il Gianfornaio

Address: Via Marmorata, 159
Opening hours: 7.30am – 9pm every day

Alembic

Address: Piazza in Piscinula, Trastevere
Opening hours:
Mon – Thurs 10.30am – 1.30am
Fri – Sun 10.30am – 2am

Settembrini

Address: Via Luigi Settembrini, 21
Opening hours:
Mon – Sat 7am – 1.30am
Sun 8am – 12am

No Starbucks here?

If you ask most people in Rome, they’ll tell you that they hate Starbucks. The entire ethos of the place is anathema to the Roman idea of cafe (“bar” in Italy) as mom-and-pop run community hub, a place to exchange news, views, and gossip, as somewhere to go for a quick slurp of tiny, inexpensive, but super-high quality coffee then to be on your way. Even though its Seattle-based founders were inspired by the cafes of Milan, with its huge cups, syrupy concoctions, burned coffee, lingering customers, overpriced cakes, impersonal atmosphere and minimum-wage staff, Starbucks is everything that Italian coffee culture isn’t.

That said many visitors to Rome, tourists and digital nomads alike, do crave the ability to sit for a few hours at a table, use the cafe’s wifi, and work, something that most regular bars don’t offer. Many English speakers mean this when they ask if there’s a “Starbucks-type place” nearby – but be very careful when using this particular shorthand, lest you find yourself on the receiving end of a highly colorful Roman telling-off!

There has also been recent news that Rome’s first two actual branches of Starbucks will be opening in May 2018 (at Termini Station and Piazza di Spagna). We predict howls of protest, followed by huge lines of local people simply desperate to get their hands on a skinny venti vegan decaf soy chai latte.

Co-working space?

Most “co-working spaces” in Rome are either purpose-built shared or open-plan offices, or they’re desks in existing companies that rent out space. Unfortunately in most cases you can’t simply rock up, pay and get on with work: most of these places demand some kind of registration or membership, and many want you either to subscribe on a weekly/monthly basis or buy a package of days in advance. This page is about casual, unofficial places so co-working spaces aren’t listed.